Peanut Butter Fudge

There are times when my craving for sugar gets so intense, that I find myself rifling through my pantry for the ingredients for peanut butter blossom cookies, double chocolate chip brownies or in a pinch, just a bag of chocolate chips. Last week, a craving hit me like a ton of bricks. I wanted fudge. Peanut butter fudge. My mother’s peanut butter fudge.

It would have been easy to make a run to the nearest convenience store where they have small cardboard boxes overflowing with individually wrapped pieces of fudge made by some woman named Betty that whips the stuff up in her kitchen in her spare time, but that wasn’t going to cut it. The fudge that I craved, and at this point needed to survive, has more texture than your run-of-the-mill peanut butter fudge. It crumbles ever so slightly when you break a piece in half. It’s decadent without being overwhelming and it is meant to be eaten by the batch, not the piece.

By the time I had all the ingredients laid out to make a batch of fudge, I was drooling. It wasn’t pretty, but I was determined and jonesing hard for some sugar.

You can’t imagine how heartbroken I was when I realized I had botched the batch. I let the sugar boil too long and stirred it too much, resulting in a grainy brick of peanut butter sugar. Not all that bad, but nowhere near where it needed to be to satisfy my craving.

The moral of the story? Use a candy thermometer when making fudge, even if your mom knows the exact second the mixture needs to come off the stove just by looking at it, and resist the urge to constantly stir. Once the mixture starts boiling, you can almost just let it go until it reaches temperature. A slow swirl here and there is all you need.

With these tips, the second batch came out perfect, was gone in a day and I started working out again.

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Peanut Butter Fudge


Scale

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • ¾ cups milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 small jar peanut butter (16.3 ounces)
  • 1 small jar marshmallow fluff (7.5 ounces)

Instructions

  1. Prepare an 11×7 baking dish by lining pan with parchment paper.
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  3. In a medium saucepan, combine sugar, cocoa powder, milk and cream of tartar. Over medium heat, bring mixture to a boil. Before mixture comes to a boil, stir occasionally to ensure that sugar is well incorporated and mixture is smooth. Once mixture reaches a boil, refrain from stirring too often. An occasional gentle swirl is all you need.
  4. {3d9e2dd3ff4a6ad7c579f6992fba32c39af0ae46cb1a0bfdb9adec03cc9df88f}http://www.fromaway.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/peanut-butter-fudge-3.jpg
  5. Boil until mixture reaches 235 degrees, or soft ball stage. Remove from heat.
  6. Immediately add peanut butter and marshmallow fluff, stirring until both are just incorporated and melted. Pour into prepared pan and let set at room temperature for at least 3 hours.
  7. Fudge will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a week.

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My love affair with food began on stepstools in the kitchens of the women in my family. Handing my great-grandmother carrots to grate for coleslaw, licking the beaters covered in my grandmother’s peanut butter frosting, and watching my mother cook up Italian dishes covered in cheese. To this day, I love cheese. Besides cheese, I love painting, ocean air, and the smell of tar after it’s rained. My husband Josh and I have created a little suburban farm with our Layla-Bug, a ridiculously hyper dog, and a one-eyed chicken. Someday, we hope to upgrade to a real country farm.

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