Rustic Chicken Thighs with All of the Garlic

When moving into a brand new house in Rockland, Maine in the middle of the winter, during a week where a snowstorm literally every other day means a fresh new foot of sticky wet snow blocking the front of the storage unit you’re trying to frantically unpack on the few clear days you have so you can find the curtains from the kids’ rooms that you KNOW YOU SAVED, your cooking priorities change a little bit.

For us, in times of anxiety, stress, and exhaustion, our cooking projects need to meet three major criteria: Whatever we cook should be easy and comforting, we should be able to get a few meals out of it, and the recipe should provide us an excuse for opening a bottle of wine, which we will then finish with dinner before collapsing into bed.

Can I pause here for just a second to tell you how ridiculously fun it is to cook in our new kitchen? After trying to make do in our crummy apartment kitchen in Burbank for the last year, where the grout never seemed to ever get clean and none of the cabinet doors would close, moving back into a full-sized, newly-renovated kitchen is an absolute pleasure. All the appliances are new and efficient. There’s light EVERYWHERE. We’ve got a big white farmhouse sink to hold piles of dirty dishes, and then dishwasher to zip everything through when we’re done. It’s heaven, and it probably warrants its own post at some point.

But for now, this chicken. Oh, this chicken. You cook the skin-on thighs until they get golden and crispy, and then you make a sauce with two entire heads of garlic and a healthy glug or three of white wine. If you choose to serve it over mashed potatoes (and you should absolutely choose to serve it over mashed potatoes), you’ll notice that the softened garlic you spoon over the top takes on the exact same texture as the potatoes, and when you take a bite of everything all together? It’s heaven.

If you’re worried about peeling all of that garlic (somewhere around 25 cloves) and thinking about using that as an excuse to not make this dish, get a hold of yourself. Don’t buy that pre-peeled garlic (it loses a lot of its flavor sitting in that sad jar), and don’t make yourself crazy peeling one clove at a time. Instead, here’s the trick we use to peel huge amounts of garlic at a time. Try it, and you won’t believe how well it works:

 

Rustic Chicken Thighs with ALL THE GARLIC

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Rustic Chicken Thighs with All of the Garlic


  • Author: MealHack.com
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 30 mins
  • Total Time: 45 mins
  • Yield: 4 1x

Description

This rustic recipe for skin-on crusty chicken thighs is made with plenty of garlic and white wine, with a final swirl of butter at the end for added richness. It’s a simple, comforting classic, perfect for spooning over mashed potatoes.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 68 chicken thighs, deboned but with skin on
  • Salt and freshly-ground black pepper
  • 2 heads of garlic, separated and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 3/4 cup white wine
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. In a Dutch oven or cast-iron skillet, heat oil over medium high heat. Add chicken, skin side-down to pan, and season with salt and pepper. Leave the chicken pieces alone for a few minutes before turning, to allow skin to get golden brown and crispy. Cook until brown on all sides, about ten minutes total, and transfer chicken pieces to a plate.
  3. Reduce heat to medium, then add garlic and cook until it begins to brown, stirring regularly. Sprinkle garlic with the flour, stir to coat, then return chicken pieces to pan and cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil. Transfer pan to oven and bake for 15 minutes.
  4. Remove pan from oven (it’s hot!), and return to stove top. Transfer chicken pieces back out of the pan to a new clean plate. Turn burner to medium-high, and whisk in the wine, making sure to scrape all the delicious crusty bits off the bottom of the pan. Add chicken broth and thyme, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens, about five minutes. Remove from heat, and swirl in butter. Taste and adjust salt and pepper as needed. Return the chicken to the pan to re-warm and coat with the sauce before serving.

Notes

Adapted from a recipe by Seasons and Suppers.

 

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Malcolm Bedell is co-author of the critically acclaimed "Eating in Maine: At Home, On the Town, and On the Road." He currently owns and operates the Ancho Honey restaurant in Maine.

11 Comments

  1. This sounds heavenly….love the idea of loads of garlic. Will probably try with 1/2 of olive oil and 1/2 of butter and hope it works! Got to watch that LDL!!! Love your blog!

  2. Yup (or should I say ayuh). I’m pretty sure there’s no way this couldn’t be amazing. I like the idea of serving it in a cast iron pan.

    Moving mid winter in Maine. Wow you’re adventurous. I bet that was a slush filled mudroom mess 🙂 Looking forward to seeing shots of the new kitchen!

  3. Looks delicious, but please! Was it your error or an editor’s, or autocorrect?? Here in Maine we “make DO”, not make DUE!!

    1. Totally! I was going to shoot my own version of a video for this technique, but then figured…why bother? These guys already nailed it.

  4. Welcome home Malcolm (and Jillian and kiddos)! I hadn’t seen that awesome video … genius! The recipe is wonderful – braised chicken thighs are a go-to for us on busy nights too. Hope you will post photos of the new kitchen, and that if you’re in the Yarmouth area, you’ll come visit us at our new digs.

  5. I made this tonight along with homemade au gratins (my grandma’s recipe) and some sautéed beans. It was an amazing meal. Thanks again for another great recipe.

  6. Great flavours but too many steps to achieve the same result. Fry off the chicken and forget the oven component for the garlic perhaps browning and then steaming instead. Lovely dish thanks for the recipe.

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